Favorite Posts of the Week: Sept. 7 – Sept. 13

13 09 2008

Here are my favorites posts (and websites) for the week of September 7th through September 13th:

Websites:

  • Cappuccino – “An open source framework that makes it easy to build desktop-caliber applications that run in a web browser”
  • Typechart – Browse, preview and compare web typography and get the corresponding CSS.




Google Chrome – Part 1

6 09 2008

The beta version of Google Chrome (Google’s new browser) was released last week. However, it is only available to Windows users.

I would have loved to download it, play around with it, and write up a comprehensive review, but I’m avoiding my windows machine until I finally get around to reformatting it. Or until I finally get around to installing Windows on my Mac.

If you visit the Google Chrome website, you can sign up to get news about the development of the browser for Mac.

So I am calling this post “Google Chrome – Part 1” with the hopes that I will soon be able to get a beta version for Mac and then review it here (“Google Chrome – Part 2”).

However, for those Windows users out there that want to try Google Chrome, I strongly encourage you to. But just remember that this is a beta version, and so functionality can be somewhat limited and there are more than likely some bugs. I’ve also put together a list of links relating to Chrome that you may want to check out:





Aurora Browser Concept

6 08 2008

Adaptive Path has joined forces with Mozilla Labs to create Aurora. This is actually part of Mozilla’s browser concept series which allows designers to showcase their visions of the future of the web.

Right now, Adaptive Path has two videos showing some of Aurora’s features. They are kind of cheesy, and I don’t understand why the people in the videos aren’t actually shown talking (watch them and you’ll see what I mean.) But they do a good job of showing the browser and the multiple different things that it can do, both at home and on a mobile device. There are several more videos that are “coming soon”. I subscribed the RSS Feed so I can see them once they come out.
If you want to watch these videos for yourself, you can visit Adaptive Path’s Aurora page. The videos are also in HD on Vimeo. I would suggest watching at Vimeo, just because it is HD and you can go into Full Screen so that you can actually see what’s going on.
This is really exciting new technology, and I would love to see it available to consumers. I know that will probably be a while, but I’ll still look forward to it!

Update – 5/7/08
The third concept video was posted today. Follow the same links as above to watch!

Update – 5/8/08
The fourth, and final, concept video was posted today. Again, you can watch it from Adaptive Path’s website or from Vimeo (which I recommend.)

Having watched all of the concept videos now, I have a semi-better idea of the Aurora browser. However, I think that there are many more fine details that should be explained. At least two of the videos touch on the use of RFID. In order for a user to get this data, the object/product/etc. in question would have to have already been tagged, making the technology useless on any product that has been produced previously (without RFID.)
When a user wants to share data, invite others to an event, or contact others, does that person need to be using the Aurora Browser as well? It seems like in order for the proposed collaboration to take place, each user would need to be using this, otherwise there would be no way to accomplish whatever it is that you were trying to do.
Does this take the place of an operating system, or is it a browser like we know today? Does it just deal with your chats, internet, online shopping, and email? I guess that’s what was so confusing to me, because in the “screen shots” it seemed like it was either a full screen application, Aurora was independent of your computer, or it was all that you would ever need. If it was independent, what would be the way that data is shared between the two devices? If it is just an application, does the way that data is organized in Aurora affect how it is organized on your computer?
I know that this all ties in with the semantic web, and I’ve been really interested in the semantic web for a while now. However, it is all kind of confusing in how it would actually work. I think that the ideas and the potential are fascinating, but it’s the specifics behind it all that need to be worked on.